Canadian Feed The Children Tops 2018 Financial Charity Ratings

Canadian Feed The Children has continued to earn trust and attention in 2018 for its work to unlock children’s potential through community-led action in Canada and around the world.

This year, Canadian Feed The Children was named a top 100 charity in Canada with the highest (4-star) rating by Charity Intelligence for its financial transparency, accountability, cost efficiency and social impact. And, Canadian Feed The Children ranked as one of the top 10 international development charities for 2019 (#14 in the Top 100), rated ‘A’ by Moneysense magazine for program spending efficiency, fundraising costs, and governance.

Others recognizing Canadian Feed The Children this year include Imagine Canada as a reaccredited charity as part of their rigorous Standards Program, and UFile in their Holiday Gift Guide for Tax-Smart Canadians.

This follows two years of recognition by the Financial Post as a Top Charity of the Year (2016 & 2017) as one of Canada’s most efficient and accountable charities, achieving exemplar status from the Voluntary Sector Reporting Awards for excellence in financial reporting by Queen’s University Centre for Governance and CPA Ontario (2014 – 2017), and achieving annual accreditation by the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance.

Partnering with Canadian donors for impact

Canadian Feed The Children continues to occupy a unique space as an international development agency that works in partnership with communities in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Ghana and Uganda, and also partners with Indigenous communities in Canada.

This innovative work is only possible with support from caring Canadians who know they can count on Canadian Feed The Children to deliver its mission.

Appropriate governance and oversight give confidence to donors, including government and foundational funders, who are integral to our ability to deliver our mission. We are truly grateful for this support,” said Sharon Pel, chair of Canadian Feed The Children’s board of directors.

In 2018, Canadian Feed The Children successfully concluded two large Global Affairs Canada-funded projects: the $7.6 million Market-Led Improved Livelihoods in Eastern Amhara Region (MILEAR) project in Ethiopia, and the $19-million Resilient and Sustainable Livelihoods Transformation (RESULT) in Ghana. Through these projects, close to 200,000 people benefited from a market-led, gender equality-based approach that helped build sustainable, community resilience.

In Canada, with thanks to the Slaight Family Foundation and other generous Canadian donors, Canadian Feed The Children has continued to expand its innovative partnerships in new Indigenous communities. Canadian Feed The Children now works with 20 Indigenous communities across Canada, including new programs in Saskatchewan and in Newfoundland & Labrador. These partnerships are leveraging community-led interventions related to local food systems and land-based education that are yielding tangible results for children and their families in terms of greater food security and food sovereignty.

Fighting global poverty together: 2019 and beyond

With an innovative women’s livelihoods strategy rolling out in Ghana, new partnerships developing with Indigenous communities across Canada, and exciting plans to strengthen sexual reproductive health and rights work internationally, Canadian Feed The Children will continue to deliver its mission with support from generous Canadian donors.

The organization’s ongoing alignment and support of the Government of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP) and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals will be a particular focus in the coming years. This will including supporting women’s and girls’ equal rights and opportunities and applying the principle of universality to poverty alleviation efforts in both Canada and abroad.

Canadian Feed The Children will continue to strengthen its commitment to financial transparency and accountability so that Canadians can know their donation will have a significant and sustainable impact on children, families and communities in Canada and around the world.

 
 
 

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